Tips for Preparing For School

School Days

School Days

School already?!?!  Yes, it’s that time of year.  When I saw that first back to school commercial, the anxiety of preparing for school came upon me.  I knew that the transition from shorts to pants, from casual dress to uniform, from free-time to structured learning was approaching quickly.  It seemed as though I just transitioned the kids into summer activities and they were finally comfortable with the routine.  No matter, school and end of summer arrives whether we (and our children) are ready or not.  This is life-transitions are always approaching-some are easy while some aren’t.

Never fear!  The Pocket Occupational Therapist is here with some tried and true suggestions for your family.  Anxiety comes from not knowing what is coming ahead.  Giving your child control of anything possible is a good way to build confidence and decrease worry.

1) Lay out pants, dress shirts, or school uniforms at least three weeks before school.  Habits can take at least 21 days to be broken.  Allow your child to shop with you and make choices if possible about school attire.  Often times, uniform material is much more stiff and “pinchy feeling” than lighter summer clothing.  Make a schedule and encourage your child to wear school clothing for a brief time each day and gradually work up the time.  Be sure to offer a reward for a job well done!  Having another child such as a sibling or friend complete this activity with your child can be especially fun.

2) Do not wait until the last-minute to purchase school supplies.  Take your child to the store and allow him to make choices of color of notebooks, folders, brand of pencils, etc.  Any choice you are able to give your child encourages feelings that he’s in control of the situation.  This is important as so many aspects of school are beyond his control.

3) Ask your child to help you to label items.  This is a good way to practice writing his name.  Allow him to  choose the color of the marker.  Use of an “old-fashioned” label maker is a good way to increase hand strength.  Squeezing the tool can work those hand muscles.

4) Obtain the daily school schedule and post it on the refrigerator or a centrally located area.  Review the schedule daily and use words such as, “It’s 9:00 now.  When you are in school you will be in reading class with Mrs. Jane.”  Do this frequently throughout the day.

5) Begin to practice handwriting and keyboarding with your child. Have him help you to make the grocery list, daily schedule, or write cards to relatives.  Making handwriting fun is important to build confidence and strengthen those hand muscles in preparation for school.

6) Begin bedtime routines at least three weeks prior to school.  It won’t be easy so do not fret!  Gradually work up to the desired bedtime and make a written “wind-down” schedule of activities that are calming and the bed time routine.  Allow your child to help make the schedule and give rewards for every little success.  Use calming music, massage, and soothing scents in the bath to encourage the body and mind to relax.

7) Meet with your child’s teacher prior to the first day of school.  A trip to his classroom with a camera is an excellent preparation activity.  Allow him to take pictures of the classroom, desk, cubby/locker and make a scrapbook of his school and room.  We had a child who was extremely fearful of the fire alarm/drill in the classroom.  We permitted him to take pictures of the fire alarm and used the Sound-Eaze and/or School -Eaze CDs to listen to the sounds of fire alarms.  Giving him the heads-up of what sounds to expect was a good tool to decrease his anxiety of the un-known.                                                                                                                         Some schools have summer camps.  If the school permits it, allow your child to sit in on a camp day/class to get used to the noises and bustle of the classroom.  The more preparation you can give your child, the more likely he will be to make a successful transition into the classroom.

8) Encourage your child that he should try his best and that he does not have to be perfect!  Mistakes are the best way to show that your child is trying.  Review errors with him and encourage him to problem solve.  Many of my clients believe that their child is trying his best, but often get too busy with life’s events to take time to reward for the good qualities and times when children succeed.  We fill out repeated questionnaires asking what our child’s weaknesses are that we often forget about their strengths.

What activities does your family have to prepare for school?  Let us know!!

By- Cara Koscinki MOT, OTR/L 

Author of The Pocket Occupational Therapist- a handbook for caregivers of children with special needs.  Questions and answers most frequently asked to OTs with easy to understand answers and fun activities you can do with your child.  Order anywhere books are sold.  www.pocketot.com 

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