We Are MOVING!

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Please follow us….we’re on the move!

Hello and Happy Spring to our faithful followers!

I have decided to move The Pocket Occupational Therapist blog to the BLOGGER network.  Here’s the link to the new blogsite.  Thank you for helping us to spread the word!!

http://thepocketot.blogspot.com/

Cara

 

You CAN do this and we’re here to help.

Supporting, advocating, parenting…..from handwriting to hair washing, The Pocket Occupational Therapist……THE book for caregivers raising children with autism, SPD, and special needs. Filled with Out of the POCKET Ideas and answers to YOUR most frequently asked questions about raising a child with special needs.

Coming in May….The SCHOOL Survival Guide for Children with Autism, SPD, and Special Needs.

By- Cara Koscinski MOT, OTR/L

 

 

Eosinophilic Night Before Christmas

 

Eosinophilic Disease Awareness

Eosinophilic Disease Awareness

EGID Night Before Christmas
‘Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house
The pump was a whirring, and waking the mouse;
His feeding bag was hung by his bed with care,
In hopes that some nutrition soon would be there;
The children were nestled all snug in their beds,
While visions of eating real food danced in their heads;
G and NG Tubes, each with their caps,
If they’re open, they’ll leak and disturb my kid’s long winter’s nap;
When the pump started beeping, there arose such a clatter,
I sprang from my bed to see what was the matter.
Away to his side, I flew like a flash, Tore open the covers – saw a kinked line and a rash….
I think of the time that he could eat food.
When people didn’t judge us, some are just rude.
The cakes, cookies, and foods that he cannot eat.
The dream of giving my boy just one food treat,
Has vanished and won’t come back very quick,
No one can cure it, not even St. Nick.
More rapid than lightning the vomiting came,
Eosinophils cause this disease, EGID is the name.
In Greenville, Colorado, Pittsburgh, and Philly!
In Boston, in Texas, in Florida, in Cincinnati!
They work on research, so our kids can grow tall!
Now find a cure today! Please we pray! Work together all!
Dreams of having a typical childhood away fly,
Because of this disease, our children must cry.
Vomiting, pain, diarrhea, and choking,
ulcers, fatigue, another doctor-are you joking?
Enemas, laxatives, surgeries, scopes,
Steroids, tests, biopsies, IVs-yet our kids have hope!
Just when you think this disease has calmed down,
Our kids are faced with another re-bound.
Insurance won’t pay for his special food,
We must fight for everything, we hate to be rude;
A pump and some formula flung on his back,
And another day goes by with him wearing his pack.
His eyes — how they twinkle! His laughter– how merry!
He cannot take even one taste of dairy!
Just a little bit of food he can’t chew with his teeth,
We must steal food away from him like a thief.
One or two safe foods, we learn to cook.
Expensive food stores, all of our money, they took.
Someday he’ll be chubby and plump, like a jolly little elf,
And I’ll laugh when I see him, in spite of myself;
Until then, we all will continue to fight…..
“Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good-night.”

© 2011 Cara Koscinski

By- Cara Koscinski MOT, OTR/L

Mom to two children with Eosiophilic Diseases.  Her younger son is GJ tube fed with only two safe foods by mouth. Author of The Pocket Occupational Therapist– a handbook for caregivers of children with special needs. Questions and answers most frequently asked to OTs with easy to understand answers and fun activities you can do with your child. Order anywhere books are sold. http://www.pocketot.com

Looking at TOYS through a therapist’s eyes!

Pocket OT- TOYSChildren of all ages learn skills through engaging in play. After all, when children are not asleep they are learning about their environment through various play activities during their day. They enjoy diving hands first into play experiences! Completing the tasks of building blocks, working a puzzle, and drawing pictures will yield skills that the child will use throughout his lifetime. Occupational therapists are fortunate enough to be a critical part of the treatment team for children with special needs. We have developed a specialty called “activity analysis.” This means we work by looking at how an activity is broken down into smaller steps. Therapists who work with children have become experts in looking at different games and toys to determine which skills a child needs to complete them. When the therapist finds a weakness in a particular skill, we can “prescribe” different games or toys to help improve the skill. It is a fun job to have, indeed!
Children are wired to use their senses to develop skills during play. A toy that gives the child something interesting that involves more than one sense will automatically be more enjoyable to him. More pathways to brain development are opened and used. Here is a list of things therapists look at when evaluating a toy:

fbpocketotresized-copy.pngOut of the POCKET Ideas!

• What does the toy feel like? What is the texture-soft, smooth, rough, hard?
• Does the toy have a scent to it? For example, certain dolls smell like fruits.
• Is the toy colorful? Are the colors bright and bold or pastel and dull?
• Does the child need both hands to manipulate the toy?
• Does the child need to read or recognize letters and numbers to enjoy the toy?
• Is there a lot of figure-ground information? Examples of toys where the ability to
determine what is in the front or background would be mazes, Eye Spy, Puzzles.
• Does the toy make noise?
• Is it a “social” toy? Like a doll house or card games.
• Does the toy require long periods of attention? Board Games
• Does the toy move, vibrate, or shake?

The list above contains a few areas we look at when examining a particular toy. Here’s an example of an analysis of a toy: A child receives a game of Hi Ho Cheery-O. He needs to be able to sit on floor or table for at least 10 minutes to play the game (control of his body) (attention); must be able to refrain from placing the small cherry manipulative into his mouth (impulse control) (age-appropriate mouthing), be able to count (number/cognitive (thinking) skills); be willing to interact with another player (social skills); be able to pick up and place the small cherries into the bucket (fine motor/coordination); be able to place the cherries into the correct colored bucket (color recognition); and be willing to accept that he may win or lose the game. Everyone knows that there are ages listed on most games, but they don’t think much about what skills are necessary and at what age those skills develop.

Remember to think about your child’s developmental age and not her ACTUAL age. For example, she may be 7 but her speech, fine motor skills, and thinking may be delayed by two years. Toys should be purchased for an 5 year old, then and not a 7 year old. Make sure that the toy is not too easy for her or she will become bored with it. I would encourage you to review the tips above and take your child on a fun visit to the toy store to see what interests her. Teacher supply stores are also full of ecuational treasures. Therapy catalogues and on-line stores such as FunandFunction offer wonderful toys in a way that’s easily searched and at reasonable prices.

Need helpful handouts?  The Pocket Occupational Therapist offers helpful FREE and for a fee handouts and webinars for you!  Also, we are having a SALE on our store items including our best-selling CDs for children who fear loud noises.  You can now purchase individual tracks, such as Fire Alarm and Thunder!  Enter 7EW6M8S9 for 20% off of your order and feel free to share.

It’s important for our children to be successful with a toy to build their confidence for learning newer, more difficult skills!

HAPPY SHOPPING!

~Cara
By- Cara Koscinski MOT, OTR/L

Mom to two children with SPD and autism. Author of The Pocket Occupational Therapist– a handbook for caregivers of children with special needs. Questions and answers most frequently asked to OTs with easy to understand answers and fun activities you can do with your child. Order anywhere books are sold. http://www.pocketot.com